Cosmetic surgery: control or compliance?

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Recently, celebrity cosmetic surgery has become a popular conversation, with many judging the procedures people – especially women – undergo in order to increase their self-confidence. The most recent attack on women who have had cosmetic surgery was carried out by Hugo Hammond, a contestant in the hit reality series, Island of love. In a challenge on the show, he said his biggest “hijack” in a woman was for her to look “fake”.

The comment shocked the girls at the villa, many of whom had had cosmetic surgery themselves. While Hammond may not have meant to offend, he has sparked a debate about how we approach and discuss cosmetic procedures, demonstrating that knowledge surrounding the subject needs to be improved, so that it can be approached with sensitivity. and consideration.

Knowledge surrounding the subject must be improved, so that it can be approached with sensitivity and consideration

Calling a woman “wrong” is not only insulting, but also seeks to destroy everything she has worked so hard to build. Assuming that women go through life-threatening procedures without thinking about it, the underlying reasons for their alterations in appearance are ignored. For most women, the reason often comes with a lot of pain and pressure to conform to stereotypical societal beauty standards.

To try and feel more comfortable in their own body, they view cosmetic surgery as giving them the confidence they need to feel happier. These women may have been bullied in school for their appearance or constantly fight with their own minds about what they saw in the mirror, with these experiences and thoughts often producing low self-esteem and mental health. decline. If lip filler or botox helps them feel more comfortable and reduces their pain, then it should be accepted by others. It’s fair to say that you will never know a woman’s story just by watching her.

For most women, the reason often comes with a lot of pain and pressure to conform to stereotypical societal beauty standards.

Island of loveFaye Winter explained how her parents bought her a job when she turned eighteen after watching their daughter suffer from being underdeveloped for years. She was finally able to feel happy in her own skin, Hugo’s comments causing immense anger, as he was seen to dismiss the pain Faye had felt.

For someone with mental health issues or low self-esteem, cosmetic surgery can seem rather appealing. Surgery can put someone in a state of euphoria, causing them to want more, making it difficult for them to know when to stop. Unfortunately, this can often lead to cosmetic surgery disasters with faces becoming completely unrecognizable. Think sloppy lips, swollen cheeks, and bruised eyes. Katie Price, a regular cosmetic surgeon, recently had another procedure that left her with extremely severe bruising and swelling, which required her to need a blood transfusion. After her operation, the model explained what she looked like ‘a monster’ and she just wanted “Old Katie back!” “

We should sympathize with, rather than criticize, those who have had surgery, as this often symbolizes years of pain.

It’s sad how much people are going to change their appearance. I believe we should sympathize with, rather than criticize, those who have had surgery, as it often symbolizes years of pain. Without an educated understanding, people will fall into the trap of viewing these procedures as mere form of vanity, with Ulrika Jonsson adding her name to this list.

In a recent column, the TV star suggested that Price’s surgery highlighted just how bad she was. ‘hungry’ for the glory. Comments like these are upsetting as they fail to recognize any other reason for plastic surgery other than vanity. Feeling like you need plastic surgery to make you feel happier is a form of body dysmorphia, but it’s not treated with the same level of consideration or severity as other disorders.

The review shouldn’t be aimed at celebrities with fresh faces, but perhaps should point to stereotypical views of the beauty industry.

Criticism should not be aimed at celebrities with fresh faces, but rather should point to stereotypical views of the beauty industry. After all, if they haven’t instilled such unrealistic ideas of what the “ideal woman / man” looks like, then we can begin to see ourselves as just as worthy as anyone else.

I believe that society has a huge role to play in the fight against body dysmorphia, and those who choose to undergo the knife should be treated with sensitivity. They are victims, many of whom suffer from mental illnesses, and their interventions should be treated with the same sympathy as those who have undergone surgery for a physical condition.


Read more about Life & Style:

Should cosmetic surgery be “recovered”?

Emulation of perfection: the rise of cosmetic surgery

Plastic surgery and social media


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